Worlds Together, Worlds Apart with Sources (Mixed media product)

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Description


A streamlined and simplified global history


The most global text for world history is also unmatched in drawing connections and comparisons across time and place. With a new compact format, engaging design, and built-in reader, this edition improves accessibility while strengthening history skill development. Expanded coverage of environmental history, new interactive History Skills Tutorials, a new Interactive Instructor’s Guide, and InQuizitive, Norton’s award-winning adaptive learning tool, support a state of the art learning experience.

About the Author


Elizabeth Pollard, lead author of Volume 1 (Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania) is associate professor of history at San Diego State University. Her research investigates women accused of witchcraft in the Roman world and explores the exchange of goods and ideas between the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean in the early centuries of the Common Era. Her pedagogical interests include digital humanities approaches to Roman history and witchcraft studies as well as the impact of global perspectives on teaching, learning, and writing about the ancient Mediterranean.

Clifford Rosenberg, lead author of Concise Edition Volume 2 (Ph.D., Princeton University) is associate professor of European history at City College and the Graduate Center, CUNY. He specializes in the history of modern France and its empire and is the author of Policing Paris: The Origins of Modern Immigration Control between the Wars. He is working now on a book about the spread of tuberculosis between France and Algeria since the mid-nineteenth century.

Robert Tignor, general editor emeritus (Ph.D., Yale University) is professor emeritus and the Rosengarten Professor of Modern and Contemporary History at Princeton University and the three-time chair of the history department. With Gyan Prakash, he introduced Princeton’s first course in world history thirty years ago. Professor Tignor has taught graduate and undergraduate courses in African history and world history and has written extensively on the history of twentieth-century Egypt, Nigeria, and Kenya. Besides his many research trips to Africa, Professor Tignor has taught at the University of Ibadan in Nigeria and the University of Nairobi in Kenya.

Alan Karras, lead media author and author of the Worlds Together, Worlds Apart AP Edition (Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania) is the associate director of International and Area Studies at the University of California at Berkeley and has previously served as chair of the College Board’s test development committee for world history and as co-chair for the College Board’s commission on AP history course revisions. The author and editor of several books, he has written about the eighteenth-century Atlantic World and, more broadly, global interactions that focus on illicit activities like smuggling and corruption. An advocate of linking the past to the present, he is now working on a history of corruption in empires, focusing on the East India Company.

Jeremy Adelman, lead author of Volume 2 (D.Phil., Oxford University) has lived and worked in seven countries and on four continents. A graduate of the University of Toronto, he earned a master’s degree in economic history at the London School of Economics (1985) and a doctorate in modern history at Oxford University (1989). He is the author or editor of ten books, including Sovereignty and Revolution in the Iberian Atlantic (2006) and Worldly Philosopher: The Odyssey of Albert O. Hirschman (2013), a chronicle of one of the twentieth century’s most original thinkers. He has been awarded fellowships by the British Council, the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, and the American Council of Learned Societies (the Frederick Burkhardt Fellowship). He is currently the Henry Charles Lea Professor of History and the director of the Global History Lab at Princeton University. His next books will be Latin America: A Global History and Earth Hunger: Markets, Resources, and the Need for Strangers.

Stephen Aron (Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley) is Professor of history at the University of California, Los Angeles and Executive Director, Institute for the Study of the American West, Autry National Center. A specialist in frontier and western American history, Aron is the author of How the West Was Lost: The Transformation of Kentucky from Daniel Boone to Henry Clay and American Confluence: The Missouri Frontier from Borderland to Border State. He has also published articles in a variety of books and journals, including the American Historical Review, the Pacific Historical Review, and the Western Historical Quarterly.

Peter Brown (Ph.D. Oxford University) is the Rollins Professor of History at Princeton University. He previously taught at London University and the University of California, Berkeley. He has written on the rise of Christianity and the end of the Roman empire. His works include: Augustine of Hippo (1967); The World of Late Antiquity (1972); The Cult of the Saints (1981); Body and Society (1988), The Rise of Western Christendom (1995 and 2002); Poverty and Leadership in the Later Roman Empire (2002). He is presently working on issues of wealth and poverty in the late Roman and early medieval Christian world.

Benjamin Elman (Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania) is a Professor of East Asian Studies and History at Princeton University. He is currently serving as the Director of the Princeton Program in East Asian Studies. He taught at the University of California, Los Angeles for over 15 years. His teaching and research fields include Chinese intellectual and cultural history, 1000-1900; the history of science in China, 1600-1930; the history of education in late imperial China; and Sino-Japanese cultural history, 1600-1850. He is the author of five books: From Philosophy to Philology: Intellectual and Social Aspects of Change in Late Imperial China (1984, 1990, 2001); Classicism, Politics, and Kinship: The Ch'ang-chou School of New Text Confucianism in Late Imperial China (1990); A Cultural History of Civil Examinations in Late Imperial China (2000); On Their Own Terms: Science in China, 1550-1900 (2005); and A Cultural History of Modern Science in China (2006). He is also the creator of "Classical Historiography for Chinese History" at http://www.princeton.edu/~classbib/, a Web-based bibliography and teaching site published since 1996 and continually revised.

Stephen Kotkin (Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley) is Professor of History and teaches European and Asian history at Princeton University, where he also serves as director of Russian Studies. He is the author of Armageddon Averted: The Soviet Collapse, 1970–2000 (2001) and Magnetic Mountain: Stalinism as a Civilization (1995) and is a coeditor of Mongolia in the Twentieth Century: Landlocked Cosmopolitan (1999). His upcoming book is entitled Impaled Horses: Labyrinths of the Ob River Basin, which is a study of the Ob River valley over the last seven centuries. Future works include a biography of Joseph Stalin entitled Stalin’s World. Professor Kotkin has also served twice as a visiting professor in Japan.

Xinru Liu (Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania) is Assistant Professor of early Indian history and world history at the College of New Jersey. She is associated with the Institute of World History, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. She is the author of Ancient India and Ancient China: Trade and Religious Exchanges, AD 1-600 (1988); Silk and Religion: an Exploration of Material Life and the Thought of People, AD 600-1200 (1996); Connections across Eurasia: Transportation, Communication, and Cultural Exchange on the Silk Roads, co-authored with Lynda Norene Shaffer (2007); A Social History of Ancient India (1990 in Chinese). Professor Xinru Liu dedicates her life to promote South Asian studies and world history studies in both the United States and the People's Republic of China.

Suzanne Marchand (Ph.D. University of Chicago) is associate professor of European and intellectual history at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge. Professor Marchand also spent a number of years teaching at Princeton University. She is the author of Down from Olympus: Archaeology and Philhellenism in Germany, 1750–1970 (1996) and is currently writing a book on German “orientalism.”

Holly Pittman (Ph.D. Columbia University) is Professor of Art History at the University of Pennsylvania where she teaches art and archaeology of Mesopotamia and the Iranian Plateau. She also serves as Curator in the Near East Section of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. Previously she served as a curator in the Ancient Near Eastern Art Department of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. She has written extensively on the art and culture of the Bronze Age in the Middle East and has participated in excavations in Cyprus, Turkey, Syria, Iraq, and Iran where she currently works. Her research investigates works of art as media through which patterns of thought, cultural development, as well as historical interactions of ancient cultures of the Near East are reconstructed.

Gyan Prakash (Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania) is professor of modern Indian history at Princeton University and a member of the Subaltern Studies Editorial Collective. He is the author of Bonded Histories: Genealogies of Labor Servitude in Colonial India (1990), Another Reason: Science and the Imagination of Modern India (1999) and Mumbai Fables (2010). Professor Prakash edited After Colonialism: Imperial Histories and Postcolonial Displacements (1995) and Noir Urbanisms (2010), codited The Space of the Modern City (2008) and Utopia/Dystopia (2010), and has written a number of articles on colonialism and history writing. He is currently working on a history of the city of Bombay. With Robert Tignor, he introduced the modern world history course at Princeton University.

Brent Shaw (Ph.D. Cambridge University) is the Andrew Fleming West Professor of Classics at Princeton University where he is Director of the Program in the Ancient World. He was previously at the University of Pennsylvania, where he chaired the Graduate Group in Ancient History. His principal areas of specialization as a Roman historian are in the subjects of Roman family history and demography, sectarian violence and conflict in Late Antiquity, and in the regional history of Africa as part of the Roman empire. He has published Spartacus and the Slaves Wars (2001), edited the papers of Sir Moses Finley, Economy and Society in Ancient Greece (1981), and published in a variety of books and journals, including The Journal of Roman Studies, The American Historical Review, The Journal of Early Christian Studies, and Past & Present.

Michael Tsin (Ph.D. Princeton) is associate professor of history and international studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He previously taught at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Princeton University, Columbia University, and the University of Florida. Professor Tsin's primary interests include the histories of modern China and colonialism, and he is the author of Nation, Governance, and Modernity in China: Canton, 1900-1927 (paperback ed., 2003). His current research explores the politics of cultural translation with regard to the refashioning of social and institutional practices in China since the mid-nineteenth century.


Product Details
ISBN: 9780393668551
ISBN-10: 039366855X
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Publication Date: January 11th, 2019
Pages: 630
Language: English